Macbeth: 2008 April / May

 

 

 

Present fears Are less than horrible imaginings

by William Shakespeare

link to cast & production team

link to what the critics said

link to photo gallery

The Scottish Play

The Troupe’s second fully-staged, indoor Shakespeare production direcetd by Peter Baldock with John Marwick as Macbeth and Fran Baldock as Lady Macbeth. In the Wellington District Theatre Federation full length play competition for 2008 the play won best the award for best sound (Rae Dickinson) and lighting (Peter Baldock).

Cast & Production Team

-Top-

CAST
Weird sister Florence McFarlane
Weird sister Sandra Gillespie
Weird sister Sue Jones
Duncan Laurie Atkinson
Malcolm Theo Nettleton
Donalbain Mike McJorrow
A Soldier Dan Milward
Rosse Chris O’Grady
Macbeth John Marwick
Banquo Damian Reid
Lady Macbeth Fran Baldock
Servant Billy Miskimmin
Fleance Charlie McFarlane
Porter Ed Hickey
Macduff Will Clannachan
Gentlewoman Carol Thompson
Old Man Steve Wilson
Seyton Peter Hughson
Murderer Dan Milward
Murderer Leo Lugtu
Doctor David Gledhill
Nobleman Steve Wilson
Lady Macduff Amber Baldock
Macduff’s daughter Isabel Stewart
Siward Steve Wilson
Young Siward James Baldock
PRODUCTION CREW
Director Peter Baldock
Composer & Sound Ray Dickinson
Set construction Bruce Caddy
Costumes Carol Thompson
Properties Julia Stuart
Lighting Peter Baldock
Lighting Mark Jones
Lighting Mike McJorrow
Signage Steve Wilson
Asst director Jerry Duckor
Rehearsal asst Julie Duckor
Stage manager Kate Booth
Lighting operator Scott Rogers
Sound operator Ray Dickinson
Front of House Anne Manager

-Top-

What the Critics Said

FOCUSED PRODUCTION OF MACBETH

REVIEWED BY: Ewen Coleman.

As a play, Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth has it all: the supernatural, treachery, murder, sword fights, which – coupled with fts many short, succinct scenes and a relatively unencumbered story line makes it one of the more engrossing of his plays. And Butterfly Creek Theatre Troupe’s production, under the direction of Peter Baldock, does much to enhance the bard’s writing with its simple setting that focuses on the actors and their interpretation of the piece. It’s a big ask, which this group pulls off exceptionally well with a fluid and focused production that is gripping, engaging, highly dramatic and very atmospheric in its presentation.

Using the whole of the cavernous school hail with nothing but black roster for a set, Macbeth’s tragedy is played out. It is prophesied by three witches (Florence Macfarlane, Sandra .Gillespie, Sue Jones) that one day Macbeth (John Marwick) a faithful servant of King Duncan (Laurie Atkinson) will wear the crown. Egged on by his wife, Lady Macbeth (Fran Baldock), he decides to speed up the process by having the king murdered.

He then becomes heady with ambition, and like many in power – Mugabe in Zimbabwe a modern-day example – reason flies out the window in the process. This in turn makes him paranoid that his life will also be short-lived. So to achieve his goal he begins a reign of terror, killing friends and foe alike, including his friend Banquo (Damian Reid). Eventually Malcolm (Theo Nettleton), the dead king’s son, and Macduff (Will Clannachan) raise an army from England against Macbeth, who is eventually defeated and killed, along with others, including Macbeth’s wife.

Avoiding sentimentality and melodrama, this production – aided by excellent lighting and sound effects brings out the humanity of the play. The Witches, who are often played as hysterically screaming youths, are mature women with power arid authority.

Macbeth’s transformation works well, his indecisions and superstition coupled with the love of his wife making his down-fall all the more heartfelt. Lady Macbeth also plays out her part with conviction, her famous sleepwalking scene: “Out, dammed spot! Out, I say!” finely judged and portrayed, making this production of one of the bard’s better-known plays compelling theatre.

Photo Gallery

 

When shall we three meet again

When shall we three meet again

 

What bloody man is this?

What bloody man is this?

 

There's no art To find the mind's construction in the face

There

 

Stop up the access and passage to remorse

Stop up the access and passage to remorse

 

Present fears Are less than horrible imaginings

Present fears are less than horrible imaginings

 

If it were done when 'tis done

If it were done when tis done

 

Double, double toil and trouble

Double, double toil and trouble

 

Things have been strangely borne.

Things have been strangely borne.

 

Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo

Thou art too like the spirit of Banquo

 

How wilt thou do for a father?

How wilt thou do for a father?

 

Let us seek out some desolate shade

Let us seek out some desolate shade

 

All my pretty ones?

All my pretty ones?

 

Out, damned spot! out, I say!

Out, damned spot! out, I say!

 

Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.

Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.